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CNS Student Association (CNSSA)

The Cognitive Neuroscience Society Student Association (CNSSA) exists to represent the student affiliates of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) and serve in an advisory capacity to the CNS Executive Committee.

Mission Statement

CNSSA Constitution

Officers

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Mission Statement

The CNSSA exists to represent the student affiliates of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) and serve in an advisory capacity to the CNS Executive Committee. As such, the CNSSA is committed to:

  • Promoting and advancing the interests of scientific research done by students.
  • Enhancing the professional development of its student members through opportunities for collaboration and networking.
  • To foster student unity.
  • To develop and organize events, projects, and subcommittees with the goal of benefiting the student members of CNS.

The Constitution of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society Student Association

(ratified March 22, 2005)

CNSSA Constitution


Officers

The current CNSSA Committee

Rachael Grazioplene, Chair

University of Minnesota Personality, Individual Differences, and Behavioral Genetics Ph. Program

Valorie N. Salimpoor,Past Chair

McGill University, Psychology/Neuroscience PhD Candidate

E. Menton McGinnis, Social Coordinator

University of Florida, Psychology Master’s/Ph. D Program

Stephanie Scala, Undergraduate Representative

McGill University

Rachael Grazioplene, Chair

University of Minnesota Personality, Individual Differences, and Behavioral Genetics Ph. Program

I am interested in understanding the genetic and biological factors that contribute to human individual differences. Before coming to Minnesota, I worked in Dr. Rex Jung’s lab in Albuquerque, NM and focused on examining the neurobiological correlates of Big Five personality, intelligence, and creativity. I am now working on extending this work in the lab of Dr. Colin DeYoung, where I hope to unravel how normal variations in personality, neurobiology, and genetics are related to the etiology of common and highly heritable disorders (including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression). Presently, my research focus involves examining gene by environment interactions on personality outcomes, and I am particularly interested in how genetic, neuropharmacological, and neuromorphological underpinnings of Openness/Intellect relate to cognitive flexibility, intelligence, apophenia, novelty, and reward sensitivity.


Valorie N. Salimpoor, Past Chair

McGill University, Psychology/Neuroscience PhD Candidate

I first became interested in neuropsychology while I was completing my undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto, where I worked on several different projects involving gender differences in cognitive processing, applications of virtual reality for neuropsychological assessment, and the ability of odors to cue emotional memories. I then pursued a Masters degree in clinical psychology at York University, where I researched cognitive function in childhood disorders and executive and frontal lobe function in children with autism. This was followed by a year of research and training at Stanford University, where I looked at neural correlates of typical and atypical mathematical cognition and repetition priming. I am currently attending Mc Gill University, working in Dr. Robert Zatorre’s laboratory. My current research interests involve functional brain imaging, emotion, and reward. More specifically, I am interested in the neural correlates of rewarding experiences and the neurochemical (e.g., dopamine) responses involved in the experience of intense emotion. We are using music to explore these links. I am applying connectivity measures to examine the temporal aspects of reward processing in the brain when people listen to new music that they end up liking for the first time. Ultimately, we are trying to understand why music has such powerful effects on the human brain!


E. Menton McGinnis, Social Coordinator

University of Florida, Psychology Master’s/Ph. D Program

Prior to entering the Cognitive and Behavioral Neurosciences Graduate Program at the University of Florida, my undergraduate research at Millsaps College included the application of Applied Behavior Analysis techniques with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, perceived stereotypes of names and faces, and mouthing habits (hand-to-mouth or object-to-mouth interaction) of infants and the behavior’s effects on learning and developmental progression. From there, my research interests progressed into questions surrounding the neural underpinnings involved in behavior and perception. Currently working under the direction of Dr. Andreas Keil at the Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention at UF, I am particularly interested in attention and perception in the human visual system, more specifically, feature-based object attention. My research stems from an interest in the underlying principles of human perception in relation to affective stimuli. I am currently engaged in multiple projects aimed specifically at uncovering the the the role of color in emotionally arousing stimuli, using ERP’s and ssVEP’s, and employing selective attention, N2pc, and binocular rivalry paradigms.


Stephanie Scala, Undergraduate Representative

McGill University

I am currently an undergrad at McGill University. For the past year, I have been a research assistant in Dr. Robert Zatorre’s laboratory where I have been able to combine my interest in the study of the human brain with my love of music. I am especially interested in the neural bases for emotion and music. Besides music, my research interests include the neurobiology of and neurochemical responses involved in addiction, depression, as well as in disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. I hope to develop more insight into the human brain specific to these areas of research.