Exploring the “Dark Side” of Brain Imaging

Q&A with Robert Thibault Guest Post by David Mehler Neuroimaging. For many people, this term invokes the thought of a photographer taking a snapshot of brain activity and then looking at the still. Cognitive neuroscientists, however, know this couldn’t be further from the truth. Image parameters, data cleaning, and statistical analyses all affect the final […]

Read More

Why Sleep?: Watch Matthew Walker’s CNS 2019 Keynote

To kick off the 26th annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Matthew Walker (UC Berkeley) gave audience members a detailed look at the myriad physiological and cognitive ways sleep influences people — and the dire consequences associated with not getting enough sleep. His presentation touched on learning, memory, aging, Alzheimer’s disease, and education, as […]

Read More

Watch: The Relation Between Psychology and Neuroscience from CNS 2019

Whether we study single cells, measure populations of neurons, characterize anatomical structure, or quantify BOLD, whether we collect reaction times or construct computational models, it is a presupposition of our field that we strive to bridge the neurosciences and the psychological/cognitive sciences. Our tools provide us with ever-greater spatial resolution and ideal temporal resolution. But […]

Read More

A Note to Worried Graduate Students: There’s Still Hope

Guest Post by Shelby L. Smith As I sat in an audience of students listening to a panel of professional researchers and data scientists at the CNS annual meeting in San Francisco, I couldn’t help but notice two things: 1) Trainees are exceptionally worried about their futures, and 2) trainees have an army of forces […]

Read More

CNS 2019 Day 4 In Brief

It was a richly fulfilling 4 days of neuroscience in San Francisco at CNS 2019! Participants attended last poster session of the meeting and a were treated wonderful set of final symposia. Talks covered the social, connected brain, semantic memory, and relational reasoning, among other topics. Check out our full photo album of the day […]

Read More

The Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) is committed to the development of mind and brain research aimed at investigating the psychological, computational, and neuroscientific bases of cognition.

The term cognitive neuroscience has now been with us for almost three decades, and identifies an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the nature of thought.

SAVE the DATE! CNS 2020

Mark your calendars for CNS 2020 in Boston, March 14-17, 2020!

Watch the CNS 2019 Keynote by Matthew Walker

Can you recall the last time you woke up without an alarm clock feeling refreshed, not needing caffeine? If the answer is “no,” you are not alone. Two-thirds of adults fail to obtain the recommended 8 hours of nightly sleep. You may be surprised by the consequences, which Matthew Walker (University of California, Berkeley) describes in his keynote for the 26th annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society annual meeting. His talk describes ... continue reading

CNS 2019 SPECIAL SESSION: The Relation Between Psychology and Neuroscience

Whether we study single cells, measure populations of neurons, characterize anatomical structure, or quantify BOLD, whether we collect reaction times or construct computational models, it is a presupposition of our field that we strive to bridge the neurosciences and the psychological/cognitive sciences. Our tools provide us with ever-greater spatial resolution and ideal temporal resolution. But do we have the right conceptual resolution? ... continue reading

 

IMG_20180324_145225

CNS 2019 Blog

Read coverage of the 26th CNS annual meeting in San Francisco, March 23-26, 2019.