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The Fred Kavli Distinguished Career Contributions Award

The Fred Kavli Distinguished Career Contributions (DCC) award honors senior cognitive neuroscientists for their distinguished career, leadership and mentoring in the field of cognitive neuroscience.  The recipient of this prize will give a lecture at our annual meeting.

Congratulations to Dr. James Haxby on being awarded the 2016 Fred Kavli Distinguished Career Contributions Award. Dr. Haxby will give his award lecture on Sunday, April 3, 2016, 4:00 –5:00 pm, in the Grand Ballroom East at the New York Hilton Midtown Hotel.

Commonality of the fine-grained structure of neural representations across brains

James Haxby, Evans Family Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Dartmouth, Professor in the Center for Mind/Brain Sciences at the University of Trento

Multivariate pattern analysis affords investigation of fine-grained patterns of neural activity that carry fine-grained distinctions in the information they represent. These patterns of brain activity in different brains can be recast as vectors in a common high-dimensional representational space with basis functions that have tuning profiles and patterns of connectivity that are common across brains. We derive transformation matrices that rotate individual anatomical spaces into the common model space with searchlight-based, whole cortex hyperalignment. This model provides a common structure that captures fine-grained distinctions among cortical patterns of response that are not modeled well by current brain atlases. The model also captures coarse-scale features of cortical topography, such as retinotopy and category-selectivity, and provides a computational account for both coarse-scale and fine-scale topographies with multiplexed topographic basis functions.


Previous Winner:

2015 Marta Kutas, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
2014 Marsel Mesulam, M.D., Northwestern University
2013 Robert T. Knight, M.D., University of California, Berkeley
2012 Morris Moscovitch, Ph.D., University of Toronto