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George A. Miller Prize in Cognitive Neuroscience

The George A. Miller Prize in Cognitive Neuroscience was established in 1995 by the Cognitive Neuroscience Society to honor the innovative scholarship of George A. Miller, whose many theoretical advances has so greatly influenced the discipline of cognitive neuroscience. The first ten years of the prize were funded by generous support from the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

The Prize shall be awarded to the nominee whose career is characterized by distinguished and sustained scholarship and research at the cutting-edge of their discipline and that has in the past, or has the potential in the future, to revolutionize cognitive neuroscience. Extraordinary innovation and high impact on international scientific thinking should be a hallmark of the recipient’s work.

Each year a call for nominations for the George A. Miller Prize will be made to the membership of the society. The recipient of the prize will attend the annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society and deliver the George A. Miller lecture.

Congratulations to Dr. Patricia Kuhl for being awarded the 2015 George A. Miller Award. Dr. Kuhl will give her award lecture on Sunday, March 29, 2015, 5:30-6:30 pm, in the Grand Ballroom of the Hyatt Regency San Francisco.

“The Neurogenetics of Language”

Patricia Kuhl
Co-Director, Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences
Director, NSF Science of Learning Center (The LIFE Center)
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

In neuroimaging studies using structural (diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging or DW-MRI) and functional (magnetoencephalography or MEG) imaging, my laboratory has produced data on the neural connectivity that underlies language processing, as well as electrophysiological measures of language functioning during various levels of language processing (e.g., phonemic, lexical, or sentential). Taken early in development, electrophysiological measures or “biomarkers” have been shown to predict future language performance in neurotypical children as well as children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Work in my laboratory is now combining these neuroimaging approaches with genetic sequencing, allowing us to understand the genetic contributions to language learning. In this talk, I will describe ongoing work in which we use neuroimaging and genetic sequencing to account for individuals’ ability to learn a second language. This work lends support to a theoretical model whose main tenet is that language learning involves domain general cognitive and social skills. This model is advancing as new data contribute to our understanding of the neurogenetics of language.

 

Previous Winners of the George A. Miller Lectureship

2015 Patricia Kuhl, Ph.D., University of Washington
2014 Jon Kaas, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University
2013 Fred Gage, Ph.D., The Salk Institute
2012 Eve Marder, Ph.D., Brandeis University
2011 Mortimer Mishkin, Ph.D., NIMH
2010 Steven Pinker, Ph.D., Harvard University
2009 Marcus Raichle, Ph.D., Washington University School of Medicine
2008 Anne Treisman, Ph.D., Princeton University
2007 Joaquin M. Fuster, Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles
2006 Steven A. Hillyard, Ph.D., University of California San Diego
2005 Leslie Ungerleider, Ph.D., National Institute of Mental Health
2004 Michael Posner, Ph.D., University of Oregon
2003 Michael Gazzaniga, Ph.D., Dartmouth College
2002 Daniel Kahneman, Ph.D., Princeton University
2001 William Newsome, Ph.D., Stanford University
2000 Patricia Churchland, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
1999 Giacommo Rizzolatti, Ph.D., University of Parma, Italy
1998 Susan Carey, Ph.D., New York University
1997 Roger Shepard, Ph.D., Stanford University
1996 David Premack, Ph.D., CNRS, France
1995 David H. Hubel, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School