CNS 2021 | Invited-Symposium Sessions

 

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TITLE

1 HOW PRIOR KNOWLEDGE SHAPES ENCODING OF NEW MEMORIES
2 IMPLICATIONS OF ANATOMICAL BRAIN NETWORK FEATURES FOR COGNITION
3 NEURAL NETWORKS IN COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
4 INVITED SYMPOSIUM IN HONOR OF ART SHIMAMURA

INVITED SYMPOSIUM 1: HOW PRIOR KNOWLEDGE SHAPES ENCODING OF NEW MEMORIES

Co-Chaired by Rik Henson and Andrea Greve, University of Cambridge

Speakers: Morris Moscovitch, Alison R. Preston, Qihong Lu, Andrea Greve

New memories are not written on a tabula rasa: rather, they are shaped by what we already know. In this symposium, the speakers will discuss how prior knowledge (such as a schema or situation model) influences the encoding of new episodic memories, drawing on a range of behavioral, neuroimaging and computational evidence.

TALK 1: THE INFLUENCE OF NEURAL CONTEXT AND REINSTATEMENT OF PRIOR KNOWLEDGE (SCHEMAS) ON ENCODING

Morris Moscovitch and Asaf Gilboa, University of Toronto

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 2: HIPPOCAMPAL-MEDIAL PREFRONTAL INTERACTIONS GUIDE HOW EXISTING MEMORIES BIAS NEW LEARNING

Alison R. Preston, The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 3: MODELING WHEN EPISODIC ENCODING SHOULD TAKE PLACE TO SUPPORT EVENT PREDICTION

Qihong Lu, Princeton University

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 4: SCHEMA AND PREDICTION ERROR IN EPISODIC MEMORY ENCODING

Andrea Greve, University of Cambridge

Abstract coming soon!

INVITED SYMPOSIUM 2: IMPLICATIONS OF ANATOMICAL BRAIN NETWORK FEATURES FOR COGNITION

Chair by Danielle Bassett, University of Pennsylvania & Santa Fe Institute

Speakers: Masud Husain, Sofie Valk, Guilia Preti, Danielle S. Bassett

In this symposium, we will canvas a growing line of scientific inquiry that seeks to understand how anatomical brain networks account for cognitive processes in humans. Such networks consist of white matter tracts whose patterning is estimated from diffusion imaging data using state-of-the-art tractography techniques. Collectively, the work demonstrates that the architecture of white matter networks provides important explanations for higher-order cognitive processes in the domains of social cognition, complex reasoning, and executive function, as well as for motivational and cognitive dysfunction.

TALK 1: BRAIN NETWORKS IN MOTIVATIONAL AND COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION

Dr. Masud Husain, Oxford University

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 2: SHAPING BRAIN STRUCTURE, HOW EVOLUTION AND COGNITION ORGANIZE THE BRAIN

Dr. Sofie Valk, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 3: EXPLORING BRAIN FUNCTION-STRUCTURE COUPLING DURING RESTING-STATE AND TASKS

Dr. Guilia Preti, University of Geneva

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 4: ANATOMICAL NETWORK CONSTRAINTS UPON (AND SUPPORT FOR) COGNITIVE CONTROL

Dr. Danielle S. Bassett, J. Peter Skirkanich Professor, University of Pennsylvania & External Professor, Santa Fe Institute

Abstract coming soon!

More Invited Symposia Coming Soon!

INVITED SYMPOSIUM 3: NEURAL NETWORKS IN COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

Co-Chaired by Christopher Summerfield, University of Oxford & Google DeepMind & Grace Lindsay, University College London

Speakers: Grace Lindsay, Robert Yang, Talia Konkle and Chris Summerfield

Deep learning models have powered recent progress in AI research, and neuroscientists are increasingly looking (once again) to neural networks as computational theories of perception and cognition. In this symposium, we consider recent work in which neural networks have shed light on the mechanisms that underlie higher cognition, including attention and working memory, task-level control, numerical cognition, and abstract reasoning.

TALK 1: EXPLORING THE TOP-DOWN SIGNALS NEEDED FOR VISUAL ATTENTION

Grace Lindsay, University College London

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 2: HOW TO STUDY COGNITION WITH RECURRENT NEURAL NETWORKS

Robert Yang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 3: HOW DO NEURAL NETWORKS LEARN OBJECT CATEGORIES?

Talia Konkle, Harvard University

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 4: NEURAL STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT IN HUMANS AND NEURAL NETWORKS

Chris Summerfield, University of Oxford & Google DeepMind

INVITED SYMPOSIUM 4: IN HONOR OF ART SHIMAMURA

Introductions by Rich Ivry, UC Berkeley

Speakers: Juliana Baldo, Charan Ranganath, Mike Anderson, Bill Prinzmetal

This symposium will honor the memory of Art Shimamura who died on October 6, 2020. Art was a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and a founding member of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society. He was a talented scientist and an award-winning teacher, extraordinarily generous, down-to-earth, funny, and creative. Art had an inspirational influence on his students, colleagues, and friends, and his highly cited research had a profound impact on our understanding of memory, cognition, and the brain. As a Guggenheim Fellow, he explored the relationships between art and cognitive neuroscience in his book, Experiencing Art: In the Brain of the Beholder. He also published other books, including Get SMART! Five Steps Toward a Healthy Brain and A Walk Around O’ahu: My Personal Pilgrimage. In this symposium, a representative set of speakers will talk about Art and his work — one representing his influence on undergraduate students, one representing his influence on graduate students, one representing his influence on postdoctoral trainees, and one representing his influence on scientific colleagues.

TALK 1: RENAISSANCE MAN: REMINISCENCES FROM A STUDENT OF ART

Juliana Baldo, UC Davis

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 2: WORKING WITH MEMORY: A JOURNEY THAT STARTED IN THE SHIMLAB

Charan Ranganath, UC Davis

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 3: INHIBITORY CONTROL OVER MEMORY BY THE PREFRONTAL CORTEX

Mike Anderson, Cambridge

Abstract coming soon!

TALK 4: THE MYSTERY SPOT AND VISUAL ILLUSIONS

Bill Prinzmetal, UC Berkeley

Abstract coming soon!